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Roof pitch refers to the steepness of a roof. Also known as roof slope, pitch is an essential aspect of roofing design. It can help the planner determine which of the many roofing materials available would be the most appropriate to use. What’s more, the roof pitch can also affect the performance of the entire roofing system over time.

Roof Shapes Image

All roofs, even ones that look flat, need to slope to some degree so that snowmelt and rainfall can drain off. But beyond that basic requirement, architects and builders have a lot of leeway, and they’ve used that creative freedom to invent a wonderful array of roof designs.

When talking about pitch, Maryland roofing contractors generally classify roofs into two categories: low- and high-slope. Low-slope roofs are normally found on commercial establishments, but they still find use among residential structures—particularly those designed to be eco-friendly dwellings. In these cases, the roofs often have solar panels and/or green roof systems integrated into their design.

High-slope roofs, on the other hand, are believed to be more visually stunning. They can last for generations because water drains right off, although this will still depend on the workmanship and on the roofing materials used. Many homeowners find roofs with steeper slopes attractive because they require minimal maintenance.

Your decision to go with a steep or a flat roof will depend on a lot of factors. Your personal tastes will figure heavily in the decision, but so should your location and the typical weather outlook in your area. It would be better to ask a professional contractor since they are well versed in the subject matter. DryTech Roofing, one of the leading roofing companies in Maryland, can help you with your decision. Their roofing expertise stems from more than a decade of excellence in the local roofing industry. To know more, visit www.drytechroofingcompany.com.

(Article Excerpt and Image From Roof Shapes, thisoldhouse.com)